Project Planning Scheduling And Control By James P Lewis Pdf

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Fundamentals of Project Management, Third Edition

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I have been gratified to receive correspondence from all over the world complimenting me on the previous editions, and I hope this will continue.

I have always written for the practitioner, so this book is not really designed for classroom use, but for the person who needs a book that is easy to read and practical. For many years I have been telling people that management— including project management—is a performing art.

Most business schools teach people to think—that is, they teach cognitive skills. That is fine for doing business analysis, making decisions, and car- rying out certain types of planning. However, the daily interactions that you have with the members of your project team and various stakeholders to the project require that you know how to deal effec- tively with people, and that set of skills is not learned through cog- nitive training. I consider that advice to be right on target. Project management is still poorly understood by many man- agers who have managed projects using only a seat-of-the-pants approach.

Many of them also do not value a formal approach. The reason is that it not only includes the tools of project management—work break- down structures, schedules, and earned value—but also incorpo- rates behavioral skills so that you can get people to actually apply the tools properly.

Project managers often have no authority but a great deal of responsibility, and with- out good skills in dealing with people, the tools will do nothing but help them document their failures with precision. I continue to be disappointed by the ineptness of many managers in dealing with people. It is only people who do that.

Yet, to quote Dr. Phil McGraw, we know less about getting performance from people than we do about getting it from our equipment. So to find out how to contact me, go to my Web site and check the contact information. The Web site is www. Best wishes to all of you. James P. Lewis, Ph. The messenger was out of breath as he entered the murky darkness of the burial chamber and greeted Ashahebsed, builder of the tombs for the family of the great king.

Ashahebsed shook his head. Another tomb would have to be added. How many was this now? At last count, the king had sired 30 sons and as many daughters. At 60 years of age, he was still fathering children at an alarming rate. Ramses the Great had more than sons and daughters over his 90 years. He was pharaoh for nearly 65 years, and no doubt the building of tombs for his progeny extended over much of that time. The best that can be said is that Ashahebsed had job secu- rity.

The worst is that the project just kept on going and going and going. Unique means that this product, service, or result is different from others that may have preceded it. And of course the budget had to change accordingly. So this was certainly no textbook project. In fact, if any of you know of a project that conforms to the textbook definition, please e-mail me about it so that I can write a case study! In reality, the only part of the definition that fits all projects is that all of them are jobs that produce something unique.

A repetitive job is not a project. Nei- ther is performing a single task. Nevertheless, a substantial number of jobs do qualify as projects, and there are many people managing them or at least trying to.

Tom Peters has argued that as much as 50 percent of the work done in organizations can be thought of as projects. I believe that in many organizations, this number is far greater. This means that, even though not everyone who is running these operations is called a project manager, these people are de facto managing proj- ects anyway.

And, while they may not need the formality of critical path schedules and earned value analysis, they do need some skills in project planning and control. Juran has also said that a project is a problem that is scheduled for solution.

I like this definition because it makes us real- ize that a project is conducted to solve a problem for the organiza- tion. However, the word problem almost always conveys something negative.

So prob- lem is being used here in a very broad sense, and projects deal with both kinds of problems, positive and negative. I think it is important to mention that these processes do not fully capture the essence of project management. We found that his method and mine were nearly identical. Practicing instant-pudding project management! It is not just tools. It is not a job position or a job title.

It is not even the sum total of these. But my experience shows that few people understand this. They believe that project manage- ment is scheduling and that if a person can do some technical job using the word technical in a very broad sense , then that individual can manage a project.

This is a pervasive problem. We forget that there are two aspects to all work, including projects—the what and the how. The what is the task to be performed. The how is the process by which it is performed. But process also applies to how the team functions overall—how its members communicate, interact, solve problems, deal with conflict, make decisions, assign work, run meetings, and every other aspect of team performance.

The tools they use—such as scheduling software, computers, project notebooks, and daily planners—help with both the what and the how. But the tools do not make an instant project manager of a person who has not been trained in the how. See Figure 1. I think we forget this. An organization has capital equipment, buildings, inventory, and other paraphernalia for the sole purpose of enabling human beings to do work that will result in desired organizational out- comes.

Yet managers often focus on everything but people. I have been told of many managers who are brilliant with computers but absolutely horrible at dealing with people. You wonder how such individuals sur- vive in their jobs, but they do. In any case, the message should be understood—organiza- tions are people, and people engage in processes to get results. The sad thing is that we know more about how to get performance from capital equipment than about how to get it from people.

As I have already said, project management deals with tools, people, and systems.

Project Planning, Scheduling & Control

Through its first two editions, Fundamentals of Project Management has helped more than , project professionals meet or exceed even the toughest project requirements. The updated and revised third edition provides an unparalleled introduction to project management, along with new tools and techniques for planning and executing projects on time, on budget, and with maximum efficiency and productivity. With sales of more than , copies, Fundamentals of Project Management has helped generations of project …. Boasting sales of more than , copies, has helped generations of project managers navigate the ins …. Meredith, Samuel J. Mantel Jr.

A new edition of the classic project management book is here, revised and updated with even more guidelines and real-world examples. This expanded fifth edition provides an applications-oriented understanding of the issues you must confront and important tips for passing the Project Management Professional exam. The standard guidebook in the Project Management field for over 20 years Project Planning Scheduling and Control now offers more strategies for dealing effectively with team members, clients, senior managers and other key stakeholders and is the perfect prescription for project success. Author Profile James P. Lewis, Ph.

Ten Stages of Project Management With the Lewis Method

A new edition of the classic project management book is here, revised and updated with even more guidelines and real-world examples. This expanded fifth edition provides an applications-oriented understanding of the issues you must confront and important tips for passing the Project Management Professional exam. The standard guidebook in the Project Management field for over 20 years Project Planning Scheduling and Control now offers more strategies for dealing effectively with team members, clients, senior managers and other key stakeholders and is the perfect prescription for project success. Account Options Accedi. Biblioteca personale Guida Ricerca Libri avanzata.

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Business: Planning & Quality Control

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The project management triangle called also the triple constraint , iron triangle and project triangle is a model of the constraints of project management. While its origins are unclear, it has been used since at least the s. For example, a project can be completed faster by increasing budget or cutting scope. Similarly, increasing scope may require equivalent increases in budget and schedule. Cutting budget without adjusting schedule or scope will lead to lower quality. Choose two.

The Lewis method of project management, developed by Dr. James P. Lewis, breaks project management into tasks that are easily understood and completed. The method is based on Lewis' experience as an electrical engineer and project manager, and is influenced by his studies in organizational psychology, the discipline in which he received his doctorate. His method structures project management into "loops" of conceptualization, implementation and execution that his consulting group says results in easily verified progress and the correction of deviations from the overall plan. The first stage in the Lewis method of project management is to prepare the concept governing the overall project. This stage includes identifying goals, potential problems, the reasons for undertaking the project, the proposed solutions, and setting criteria for completion.

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Business: Planning & Quality Control

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