Ethics And Social Responsibility In Business Pdf

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In , the UN enacted the UN, corporate citizenship, corporate responsibility, sustainable business and finally, sustainable economic development, to work with society, and to contribute to a, Corporate social responsibilities CSR is divided into economic, legal, and, ethical responsibilities. CSR perception is related to care ethics.

In addition to the articles on this current page, also see the following blog that has posts related to Ethics and Social Responsibility. Scan down the blog's page to see various posts. Also see the section "Recent Blog Posts" in the sidebar of the blog or click on "next" near the bottom of a post in the blog. The blog also links to numerous free related resources. Library's Business Ethics Blog.

Social responsibility

In addition to the articles on this current page, also see the following blog that has posts related to Ethics and Social Responsibility. Scan down the blog's page to see various posts. Also see the section "Recent Blog Posts" in the sidebar of the blog or click on "next" near the bottom of a post in the blog. The blog also links to numerous free related resources. Library's Business Ethics Blog. Simply put, ethics involves learning what is right or wrong, and then doing the right thing -- but "the right thing" is not nearly as straightforward as conveyed in a great deal of business ethics literature.

Most ethical dilemmas in the workplace are not simply a matter of "Should Bob steal from Jack? Many ethicists assert there's always a right thing to do based on moral principle, and others believe the right thing to do depends on the situation -- ultimately it's up to the individual.

Many philosophers consider ethics to be the "science of conduct. Philosophers have been discussing ethics for at least years, since the time of Socrates and Plato. Many ethicists consider emerging ethical beliefs to be "state of the art" legal matters, i.

Values which guide how we ought to behave are considered moral values, e. Statements around how these values are applied are sometimes called moral or ethical principles.

Ethics Value at Work Wallace and Pekel explain that attention to business ethics is critical during times of fundamental change -- times much like those faced now by businesses, both nonprofit or for-profit.

In times of fundamental change, values that were previously taken for granted are now strongly questioned. Many of these values are no longer followed. Consequently, there is no clear moral compass to guide leaders through complex dilemmas about what is right or wrong. Attention to ethics in the workplace sensitizes leaders and staff to how they should act. Perhaps most important, attention to ethics in the workplaces helps ensure that when leaders and managers are struggling in times of crises and confusion, they retain a strong moral compass.

However, attention to business ethics provides numerous other benefits, as well these benefits are listed later in this document. Note that many people react that business ethics, with its continuing attention to "doing the right thing," only asserts the obvious "be good," "don't lie," etc.

For many of us, these principles of the obvious can go right out the door during times of stress. Consequently, business ethics can be strong preventative medicine. Anyway, there are many other benefits of managing ethics in the workplace. These benefits are explained later in this document. Organizations can manage ethics in their workplaces by establishing an ethics management program. They provide guidance in ethical dilemmas. Business people need more practical tools and information to understand their values and how to manage them.

According to Wallace, "A credo generally describes the highest values to which the company aspires to operate. Some business ethicists disagree that codes have any value. Usually they explain that too much focus is put on the codes themselves, and that codes themselves are not influential in managing ethics in the workplace.

Many ethicists note that it's the developing and continuing dialogue around the code's values that is most important. If your organization is quite large, e. Codes should not be developed out of the Human Resource or Legal departments alone, as is too often done. Codes are insufficient if intended only to ensure that policies are legal. All staff must see the ethics program being driven by top management. Note that codes of ethics and codes of conduct may be the same in some organizations, depending on the organization's culture and operations and on the ultimate level of specificity in the code s.

Perhaps too often, business ethics is portrayed as a matter of resolving conflicts in which one option appears to be the clear choice. For example, case studies are often presented in which an employee is faced with whether or not to lie, steal, cheat, abuse another, break terms of a contract, etc.

However, ethical dilemmas faced by managers are often more real-to-life and highly complex with no clear guidelines, whether in law or often in religion. As noted earlier in this document, Doug Wallace, Twin Cities-based consultant, explains that one knows when they have a significant ethical conflict when there is presence of a significant value conflicts among differing interests, b real alternatives that are equality justifiable, and c significant consequences on "stakeholders" in the situation.

An ethical dilemma exists when one is faced with having to make a choice among these alternatives. What's an Ethical Dilemma? Culture is comprised of the values, norms, folkways and behaviors of an organization. Ethics is about moral values, or values regarding right and wrong. Therefore, cultural assessments can be extremely valuable when assessing the moral values in an organization.

Also consider Organizational Culture Organizational Assessments. The ethics program is essentially useless unless all staff members are trained about what it is, how it works and their roles in it. The nature of the system may invite suspicion if not handled openly and honestly. In addition, no matter how fair and up-to-date is a set of policies, the legal system will often interpret employee behavior rather than written policies as de facto policy.

Therefore, all staff must be aware of and act in full accordance with policies and procedures this is true, whether policies and procedures are for ethics programs or personnel management. This full accordance requires training about policies and procedures. Blankfein, How are you going to put ethics first? Cost of a Culture of Fear? Social responsibility and business ethics are often regarding as the same concepts.

However, the social responsibility movement is but one aspect of the overall discipline of business ethics. The social responsibility movement arose particularly during the s with increased public consciousness about the role of business in helping to cultivate and maintain highly ethical practices in society and particularly in the natural environment.

There are many online resources in regard to social responsibility. The following will help to get your started. To round out your knowledge of this Library topic, you may want to review some related topics, available from the link below. Each of the related topics includes free, online resources.

Also, scan the Recommended Books listed below. They have been selected for their relevance and highly practical nature. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy. Library's Business Ethics Blog About Ethics, Principles and Moral Values See a video about managing ethical and legal risks and boundaries, and what to do if you encounter ethical or legal issues.

The video is in the context of consulting, but applies to leading, as well. From the Consultants Development Institute.

Business Ethics, Corporate Social Responsibility and

Social responsibility is an ethical framework and suggests that an individual has an obligation to work and cooperate with other individuals and organizations for the benefit of society at large. A trade-off may exist between economic development, in the material sense, and the welfare of the society and environment, [1] though this has been challenged by many reports over the past decade. It pertains not only to business organizations but also to everyone whose any action impacts the environment. Another example is keeping the outdoors free of trash and litter by using the ethical framework combining the resources of land managers, municipalities, non-profits, educational institutions, businesses, manufacturers, and individual volunteers will be required to solve the ocean microplastics crisis. Social responsibility must be intergenerational since the actions of one generation have consequences on those following. Businesses can use ethical decision making to secure their businesses by making decisions that allow for government agencies to minimize their involvement with the corporation. Some critics argue that corporate social responsibility CSR distracts from the fundamental economic role of businesses; others argue that it is nothing more than superficial window-dressing, or " greenwashing "; [11] others argue that it is an attempt to pre-empt the role of governments as a watchdog over powerful corporations though there is no systematic evidence to support these criticisms.

States that in the present era of global marketing, as more companies enter international markets, ethical problems are likely to increase. Divergence in ethical behavior and attitudes of marketing professionals across cultures can be explained by, among other variables, differences in perceptions regarding the importance of ethics and social responsibility in achieving organizational effectiveness. This study investigates the variation in those perceptions among marketing professionals from Australia, Malaysia, South Africa, and the USA. Singhapakdi, A. Report bugs here. Please share your general feedback.

Social Responsibility and Ethics

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Social responsibility is an ethical theory in which individuals are accountable for fulfilling their civic duty, and the actions of an individual must benefit the whole of society. In this way, there must be a balance between economic growth and the welfare of society and the environment. If this equilibrium is maintained, then social responsibility is accomplished. The theory of social responsibility is built on a system of ethics, in which decisions and actions must be ethically validated before proceeding. If the action or decision causes harm to society or the environment, then it would be considered to be socially irresponsible.

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Business Ethics and Social Responsibility
1 Response
  1. Frank B.

    This is “Business Ethics and Social Responsibility”, chapter 2 from the book An Introduction to code_of_business_conduct_and_benbakerbooks.org) to view its posted.

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